Socks

Hello!

The falling winter temperatures mean I am now waking up to a thick layer of frost coating the grass outside. The chilly temperatures made me want to make a new pair of winter socks – I started these ages ago and have finally finished them!

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I used a Roam Fusion 4 ply wool which was specially designed for sock knitting (although any 4 ply wool will do), 5 x 3.0mm needles and a free pattern from Roam. The fair isle style pattern does make them look very complicated but it is in fact just the different colours of the wool. For the ribbing at the top, I did 2 Knit, 2 Purl stitches (repeated) for a wider ribbing but it also works with just 1 Knit, 1Purl.

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I have heard lots of people say that turning the heel is the hardest part of knitting a sock but, in my opinion, as long as you are following a clear set of instructions, it’s really not that difficult and just a case of decreasing stiches.

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In fact, I found the hardest part was actually casting on (starting) the sock as you have to use either three or four needles at a time, depending on your pattern. However, there are lots of videos on youtube which I found very helpful.

These are actually the second pair of socks I have knitted. The first (below) were not nearly as neat but helped me to develop the various skills needed.

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Despite what you may be thinking, the simple sock pattern is really not too complicated as only two main stitches are needed – the basic knit and purl. Look for a good, clear pattern and choose a 4 ply wool which will be easy to knit with – fluffy ones are nice but can make your first sock a bit tricky to knit. Finally, don’t give up! I have hand to unwind several parts of my socks and re-knit them but it is so satisfying to have a pair you have knitted yourself with the added benefit that they are incredibly cosy :¬)

Good luck!

Blogging love

xxxx

 

Bunting!

Evening!

I’m already looking forward to the part of my day where I write my posts – it’s incredibly therapeutic.

So, here’s an easy little project to do which you can whip up in an hour or two, perfect for these blustery, rainy days we are having.

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BUNTING!

I LOVE LOVE LOVE BUNTING! I don’t know why – maybe it’s the pleasing triangular shapes or the contrasting pretty material patterns but it makes my heart lift whenever I see it. I’m not alone right? :¬)

So, here is my really simple tutorial:

- You will need some pretty fabrics (this is good for using up scraps), some bias binding (available in any good sewing shop/haberdashery), a sewing machine, some tailors chalk (or a pencil) and scissors

1. Measure, draw (using the chalk/pencil) and cut out a triangle shape from some cardboard – this will be your triangle stencil and you will need to make it slightly bigger than you want your bunting triangles to allow for seams. I like to make two of my triangle sides significantly longer so that they are quite long and droopy.

2. Draw around and cut out triangles from your fabric. You will need two triangles of fabric for every bunting triangle – one for the front and one for the back.

3. Put two fabric triangles together, right sides together (ie. the sides which will show should face inwards), and pin together.

4. Using your sewing machine, sew together the two long sides of the triangle, leaving a 1cm seam, leaving the top edge open.

5. Turn the triangle right side out, using the point of a knitting needle to gently ease the triangle point out if necessary. Continue until you have the required number of triangles and then iron them all flat.

6. Take your bias binding – this is a strip of fabric which is already folded to provide a ready-made seam which won’t fray. You can make your own but it’s easier and cheaper to buy it. Lay it out and pin a bunting triangle so that the top open edge is sandwiched between the two sides of the bias binding as below:

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7. Pin all the triangles in this way.

8. Using the sewing machine, sew along the bias binding so that the triangles are sewn into the bias binding.

9. Voila! This is how I display mine:

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I’ve only used four different fabrics here but you could use a whole mish mash of different fabrics like this bunting which I made to decorate my room at Uni:

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Get sewing!

Blogging love

xxxx

Mistletoe Pattern

Hello!

Here is, as promised, the pattern for the crochet mistletoe in the wreath below:
I’m writing in British crochet terms:
Chain stitch: start with a slip knot on hook, yarn over hook and pull through knot on hook
SL ST: slip stitch (insert hook into stitch, yarn over and pull back through)
DC: double crochet (insert hook into stitch, yarn over, pull back through stitch, yarn over and pull through both stitches on hook)
HTR: half treble (yarn over, insert hook into stitch, yarn over, pull back through stitch, yarn over and pull through all three stitches on hook)

These instructions can be quite confusing at first but once you get the hang of all the stitches the crochet grows really quickly. If you are stuck, try searching crochet stitch tutorials on youtube – that was how I taught myself.

So the pattern:
- Using a green wool (I find ones which are part cotton work best for definition) Chain 8
- 2 HTR into the first 2 chain stitches
- 3 DC into the next three chain stitches
- 2 SL ST into the next two chain stitches
- You should have come to the end of the chain. Now chain 8 more stitches.
- Repeat steps 2-4 above so: 2 HTR, 3 DC, 2 SL ST
- You should now have two leaf shaped pieces of crochet. From the bottom of the second leaf, do a SL ST into the bottom of the first leaf to pull them together.
- Crochet a chain of stitches for the required length of the mistletoe stem – I usually go for about 6.
- Fasten off

For the berries, use white wool:
- Chain 2
- 1 HTR into the first chain stitch
- 1 SL ST into the second stitch and pull and shape to make a berry
- Fasten off

Hopefully you will find this useful!

Blogging love

xxxx

Crochet Christmas Wreath

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Hello again!

So, for my first creative blog post I thought I’d share a little Christmas project before we get too far into 2014. This Christmas Wreath was inspired by this wonderful blog here: http://www.attic24.typepad.com/

Attic24 is, in my opinion, the best blog for crochet out there. Lucy, the Attic24 blogger, has created some amazing wreaths which inspired me to create the one above. Like hers, I crocheted what was essentially a scarf and sewed it, sock-like, onto a polystyrene wreath. I then crocheted holly leaves (Attic24 pattern), mistletoe, berries, curly feelers(Attic24 pattern), leaves and a ribbon.

It took me about 4 weeks to complete as I used it for creative downtime between studying :¬) It is definitely the most satisfying crochet project I have made to date and, as Attic24 has shown, can be modified to suit anytime of year, not just Christmas.

The mistletoe pattern was my own and the ribbon was just many rows of double crochet but I attach links to the rest of the patterns I used below. I’ll try to put up a tutorial for the mistletoe pattern in due course.

I hope this inspires you to give crochet a go!(I personally find it much easier than knitting so if you find that tricky try crochet instead!)

Till next time

Blogging love

xxxx

Holly leaf pattern from Attic24: http://attic24.typepad.com/weblog/holly-leaves.html (the leaves were made using this pattern but without adding the row of spikes)
Curly feelers: http://attic24.typepad.com/weblog/2013/11/autumn-wreath-ta-dah.html (the pattern is about halfway down this page and really simple)

Hello there!

Hello there!

Thank you very much for visiting me here on my blog. I intend it to become a space for compiling all my crochet, sewing, knitting, making and generally creative projects. Hopefully, this will not only help me to remember what I have done but also perhaps inspire you to get involved in the creative side of life.

First of all, a little introduction about me. I am a university student and, when not studying geography, I live at home with my parents and little sister in a old house in the countryside with chickens, Chinese painted quail and a hamster named Teddy.

As you might have guessed, I came up with the idea of starting a blog when on a very blustery morning walk in January whilst trying to forget the fact that I was soaking wet.

I aim to have my first creative post up here very soon so feel free to come back and visit me :¬)

Until the next post

Blogging love

xxxx

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